Irish Folklore & Mythology Illustrations by Denise Nestor


Denise Nestor is the artist behind this collection of Irish Folklore and Mythology illustrations. They were created for a 2018 calendar that was available to purchase at the Irish Design Shop. Unfortunately, the calendar is now sold out. Each piece includes a description of the story that it is based on, check out Denise’s website to see them all. I have included a few of my favorite stories below.


“We have long admired the delicate, compelling work of illustrator Denise Nestor, and were thrilled when she was so enthusiastic about producing our 2018 calendar. The theme Denise chose, ‘Irish Folklore and Mythology’ suits her sensitive, illustrative style perfectly. A mix of mythical creatures and more familiar Irish flora and fauna feature throughout the 12 months.” – Irish Design Shop


Mythology Illustrations


The Werewolves of Ossory

Mythology Illustrations


Aengus Óg

Mythology Illustrations


Cú Sidhe (Faery Hound) – 

The Cú Sidhe is a supernatural hound, described as being the size of a small horse, with long white hair, one red ear, and a plaited tail. Some are thought to have black or green hair. Oisín describes seeing these magical hounds chasing deer when he arrived in Tír na nÓg. Appearing and disappearing at will, the Cú Sidhe are said to roam the land performing certain tasks for the faeries. Among such tasks was the abduction of human women, who were taken to the Otherworld to nurse faery babies.
They play a similar role to the Bean Sidhe (Bean Sí), the well-known foreteller of death in Irish folklore. When the Cú Sidhe was heard howling three times, it was understood to foreshadow a death. The hound was thought to be there to lead the soul to the afterlife or the Otherworld.

Irish Folklore


Faery Birds

Mythology Illustrations


May Day

Mythology Illustrations


The Horned God

In Celtic terms, the stag represented the renewal of nature and the fertility of the forest. Understood more generally as a symbol of the natural world, the stag was dangerous but also benign and beneficial. Cernunnos was the Celtic god of fertility, animals, wealth and the underworld. Sometimes depicted as a man with antlers, he was referred to as ‘The Horned God’.

Irish Folklore


Foxgloves

Denise Nestor


The Sons of Tuireann

Mythology Illustrations


Chasing Rabbits

Irish Folklore


The Púca

The Púca is a malevolent faery that can shape-shift into different forms. It often appears as a black horse and is sometimes seen as a dark animal that resembles a hare or a rabbit with glowing eyes and long black hair. It is most often seen at night, sitting silently on the branch of a tree. It is said that you shouldn’t eat blackberries after the 31st of October because the Púca covers them in spit on Hallowe’en Night.

Denise Nestor


Dealán Dé

Mythology Illustrations


Wren Day

Irish Folklore

Via: Denise Nestor

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.